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Tag: Vancouver

Letter to the Occupy Together Movement

The word “occupy” has understandably ignited criticism from Indigenous people as having deeply colonial implications. Its use erases the brutal history of genocide that settler societies have been built on. This is not simply a rhetorical or fringe point; it is a profound and indisputable matter of fact that this land is already occupied. —Harsha Walia

The Museum Formerly Known as Centre A

For the past 10 years, Centre A — Vancouver International Centre for Contemporary Asian Art — has been a vigorous anomaly in the contemporary art scene in Vancouver. The institution straddles the roles of artist-run centre and public gallery, as it focuses on connecting artistic practices from across the pacific region

Observations from The International Chilliwack Biennial

Friendly orange paper signs marked campsite posts, sketching out a makeshift frame of space within a space that was immediately reassuring. Pulling into the campground to pitch a tent, one came first upon these signs and then, around the first bend, a gathering of artists, curators, art historians and writers from Vancouver, who mingled over a dinner designed by artist Ron Tran, some wearing white get-ups resembling a bizarre combination of hazmat suit and mosquito net. In their quasi sci-fi garb, these curious campers were not quite explained by the serious-looking black sign that announced their location as “Camp Delta.”