Tag: Foodculture

A New Ñame

When we begin to see our seemingly disparate present-day cultures and political and socioeconomic realities through a decolonial lens, we can reclaim traditions by reconnecting our endurance of five centuries in the Americas to our future, ultimate liberation. Decolonial African American cuisine is an ownership and a repossession of African food history that unapologetically positions the Atlantic Slave Trade and its pervasive legacy as a central point of global decolonial discourse. —Berlin Reed

36-4 / Editorial

As part of FUSE’s popular States of Postcoloniality series, the artists and writers in this issue explore decoloniality in aesthetic practice across the Americas and the Caribbean. Produced in partnership with the e-fagia organization.

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36-4 / Decolonial Aesthetics

Featuring: Berlin REED; Miguel ROJAS-SOTELO; Gordon Brent INGRAM; Heidi McKENZIE; the TRANSNATIONAL DECOLONIAL INSTITUTE; Naufus RAMÍREZ-FIGUEROA; David GARNEAU; Julie NAGAM; Kency CORNEJO; Leah DECTER and Carla TAUNTON; Gita HASHEMI, Tannis NIELSEN and Maryam TAGHAVI

Basil AlZeri / The Archivist in the Kitchen

Cooking became an entry-point for me to introduce myself, as a human being who is also a Palestinian, to my peers in Canada. Cuisine became a way for me to express myself, my history, my cultural identity, with a lot of specificity but without being over-determined by certain politics. — Basil AlZeri

FUSE 23-2: September 2000

One thing that sets FUSE apart from other magazines covering similar territory is its consistent, continuous attention to issues that get short shrift elsewhere. One case in point is the pleasant overlap between the last issue and this one. Adrienne Lai’s essay in vol. 23, no. 1, “Renegotiating the Terms of Inclusion,” is a thought-provoking critical analysis of Jin-me Yoon’s A Group of Sixty-Seven.