Tag: decolonization

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SONNY ASSU

Sonny Assu: Possession
Curated by Jon Davies
Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square
1 December 2013 – 16 February
Review by Ellyn Walker

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Extra-Rational Aesthetic Action and Cultural Decolonization

For several years I have remained disturbed by three aesthetic actions: Rebecca Belmore’s yell as a prelude to a panel discussion; Guillermo Gómez-Peña’s threat to decapitate a woman during a work of performance art; and Terrance Houle’s presentation of his naked, fleshy belly in photographs and performances. —David Garneau

36-4 / Editorial

As part of FUSE’s popular States of Postcoloniality series, the artists and writers in this issue explore decoloniality in aesthetic practice across the Americas and the Caribbean. Produced in partnership with the e-fagia organization.

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36-4 / Decolonial Aesthetics

Featuring: Berlin REED; Miguel ROJAS-SOTELO; Gordon Brent INGRAM; Heidi McKENZIE; the TRANSNATIONAL DECOLONIAL INSTITUTE; Naufus RAMÍREZ-FIGUEROA; David GARNEAU; Julie NAGAM; Kency CORNEJO; Leah DECTER and Carla TAUNTON; Gita HASHEMI, Tannis NIELSEN and Maryam TAGHAVI

Basil AlZeri / The Archivist in the Kitchen

Cooking became an entry-point for me to introduce myself, as a human being who is also a Palestinian, to my peers in Canada. Cuisine became a way for me to express myself, my history, my cultural identity, with a lot of specificity but without being over-determined by certain politics. — Basil AlZeri

35-2/Editorial

With the States of Postcoloniality series, FUSE set out to engage the roles of artists and the arts in a global politics of decolonization. With this issue, we are concerned with art’s contribution to Indigenous sovereignty in the North.

35-2 / NORTH

Issue 35-2 Contributors: Jackie Price; Vanessa Dion Fletcher; Lucas Ittulak; Ravi de Costa; Art and Cold Cash; Agata Durkalec; Heather Iloliorte and Billy Gauthier; Mark Igloliorte; Anna Hudson; Amy Zion; Chris Gehman; Bart Gazzola; Amy Fung

Letter to the Occupy Together Movement

The word “occupy” has understandably ignited criticism from Indigenous people as having deeply colonial implications. Its use erases the brutal history of genocide that settler societies have been built on. This is not simply a rhetorical or fringe point; it is a profound and indisputable matter of fact that this land is already occupied. —Harsha Walia

35-1/Editorial

Contributors: Harsha Walia, Syed Hussan, Max Haiven, Erin Konsmo & Louis Esme Cruz, Etienne Turpin, Kevin Smith & Clayton Thomas-Muller, Nasrin Himada w/ Red Channels, Haseeb Ahmed, Peter Morin, Chase Joynt & Alexis Mitchell, Linda Grussani, Natalie Kouri-Towe, Julian Jason Haladyn & Miriam Jordan, Nahed Mansour

Not a Collection of Cool Stuff: On The Bidoun Library

“The thing is, the library is not a collection of the coolest or best art books coming out of the Middle East—although we may possess many of them—it is in fact a material critique of cultural production and the discourses that presuppose such books…They are no longer just the transparent envelopes for discourse, they are objects—and as objects are subject to the pressures and incentives of material production and a wide range of material objectives; economic, historical and political.” —Babak Radboy (Bidoun Library)