Category: Feature

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Postcolonial Dilemna Track #01 (Redux)

Kongo Astronauts presents Postcolonial Dilemna Track #01 (Redux), a psychotronic film from DR Congo by Eléonore Hellio (2010) – Curated by SPARCK in collaboration with Kongo Astronauts for FUSE 37-2/Speculation.

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Dilemna Track #02

Kongo Astronauts presents Postcolonial Dilemna Track #02, a psychotronic film from DR Congo by Eléonore Hellio (2012) – Curated by SPARCK in collaboration with Kongo Astronauts for FUSE 37-2/Speculation.

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Postcolonial Dilemna Track #03

Kongo Astronauts presents Postcolonial Dilemna Track #03 (Unended) – A psychotronic Film from DR Congo (2014) – Curated by SPARCK in collaboration with Kongo Astronauts for FUSE 37-2/Speculation.

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Art, Austerity and the Production of Fear

We might say that everything has a lifespan and artist-run centres are no different. Some end before their time, others transform and renew themselves through successive generations, and some remain on life support far longer than
 is dignified, beholden to the palliative care of a burnt out “new generation” of cultural workers tasked with working out their present and future while struggling to honour their past.

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Extra-Rational Aesthetic Action and Cultural Decolonization

For several years I have remained disturbed by three aesthetic actions: Rebecca Belmore’s yell as a prelude to a panel discussion; Guillermo Gómez-Peña’s threat to decapitate a woman during a work of performance art; and Terrance Houle’s presentation of his naked, fleshy belly in photographs and performances. —David Garneau

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SILENCE = _____________

I did not feel that the issues were too complex to stop making work. I still feel this today. —Avram Finkelstein of ACT UP and Gran Fury, in conversation with Alex McClelland and Geneviève Trudel

Cannibalized Images

This is, in essence, the story of a single photograph. The image, a group portrait of six individuals accused of cannibalism during the brutal Soviet famine of 1920–22, has been used by historians as a mute testament to the horrors of the Russian Civil War and the period of War Communism. A closer look at the photograph, however, reveals that it is hardly a transparent document. —Kathleen Tahk