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Monthly Archives: December 2010

The Colour Flyer Campaign: A Guide For An Artist Entering Political Life.

“Hi. My name is Keith Cole and I am running for Mayor. Can I give you a colour flyer?”

On February 12th, 2010, in front of a very large, unsuspecting crowd at Buddies In Bad Times Theatre I announced that I would be a candidate for the top job in the City of Toronto. That’s right, I was running to be the Mayor.

Contamination and Reclamation: Robert Houle’s Paris/Ojibwa

Paris/Ojibwa is the latest multimedia installation by world-renowned Anishinabeg (Ojibwa) [1] artist Robert Houle. The installation is a time portal to 1845, when a troupe of Ojibwa dancers lead by a man named Maungwudaus travelled to Paris to dance for King Louis-Phillipe of France and a public of 4,000 French ladies and gentlemen. They were part of American painter George Catlin’s “Indian Museum,” [2] presented as living exhibits of an ancient culture.

The Migrating Sound Scape: Dipna Horra’s Avaaz

Sound artist Dipna Horra uses field and voice recordings to create aural environments that simultaneously present a sense of location and dislocation. With Avaaz, Horra recounts a narrative of migration from India to Africa and then Canada, a narrative that undergoes translation and transposition. Horra’s sound installation consists of a central table set for tea, a wheeled tea trolley in the corner, a suspended window pane on the left of the gallery space and an unobtrusive air vent at our feet. Simple furniture, understated architectural features and fine china are the conduits through which the sound artefacts, that tell the artist’s story are emitted. Horra’s kitchen installation is a theatrical space in which the continuity of ancestral memory both reassures and unsettles.

In the Face of a National Myth

The Turtle/Television Island Project features the work of two contemporary aboriginal artists: James Luna, of the Puyoukitchum (Luiseño) nation, who is based in La Jolla, California; and ssipsis, of the Penobscot nation of Indian Island, Maine. Both of these artists use contemporary media to critically reflect on and repair the often static ways in which Native Americans are portrayed by the white/Western world.

The Present Nature of Things: Suzanne Lacy’s Leaving Art

In a conversation with Lucy Lippard in 1985, Suzanne Lacy spoke of the history of women’s labor unions making use of communal activities such as pageants, dinner parties, gift exchanges and birthday celebrations as a means to build solidarity amongst women. Art and activism have a longstanding overlapping history. In the mid-80s, Suzanne Lacy began retroactively framing the large-scale performances she had been undertaking since the early 70s within the tradition of pageantry. Pageants in the early part of the 20th century were a deeply community-oriented and non-commercial form of entertainment: they were often massive productions involving a cast of hundreds of volunteers in performances of theatre, dance and music.

Frequently Asked Questions about the 40 for 40 campaign

How long has Fuse been around?

For almost 40 years, Fuse Magazine has provided a space for diverse communities to speak critically about their society as artists and activists. Over the past four decades legions of people have come through the organization and imagined a better future in the pages of the magazine.